Background and objective: The brain-computer interface (BCI) technology acquires human brain electrical signals, which can be effectively and successfully used to control external devices, potentially supporting subjects suffering from motor impairments in the interaction with the environment. To this aim, BCI systems must correctly decode and interpret neurophysiological signals reflecting the intention of the subjects to move. Therefore, the accurate classification of single events in motor tasks represents a fundamental challenge in ensuring efficient communication and control between users and BCIs. Movement-associated changes in electroencephalographic (EEG) sensorimotor rhythms, such as event-related desynchronization (ERD), are well-known features of discriminating motor tasks. Fractal dimension (FD) can be used to evaluate the complexity and self-similarity in brain signals, potentially providing complementary information to frequency-based signal features. Methods: In the present work, we introduce FD as a novel feature for subject-independent event classification, and we test several machine learning (ML) models in behavioural tasks of motor imagery (MI) and motor execution (ME). Results: Our results show that FD improves the classification accuracy of ML compared to ERD. Furthermore, unilateral hand movements have higher classification accuracy than bilateral movements in both MI and ME tasks. Conclusions: These results provide further insights into subject-independent event classification in BCI systems and demonstrate the potential of FD as a discriminative feature for EEG signals.

Fractal Dimension as a discriminative feature for high accuracy classification in motor imagery EEG-based brain-computer interface / Moaveninejad, Sadaf; D'Onofrio, Valentina; Tecchio, Franca; Ferracuti, Francesco; Iarlori, Sabrina; Monteriù, Andrea; Porcaro, Camillo. - In: COMPUTER METHODS AND PROGRAMS IN BIOMEDICINE. - ISSN 0169-2607. - 244:(2024). [10.1016/j.cmpb.2023.107944]

Fractal Dimension as a discriminative feature for high accuracy classification in motor imagery EEG-based brain-computer interface

Ferracuti, Francesco;Iarlori, Sabrina;Monteriù, Andrea;Porcaro, Camillo
2024-01-01

Abstract

Background and objective: The brain-computer interface (BCI) technology acquires human brain electrical signals, which can be effectively and successfully used to control external devices, potentially supporting subjects suffering from motor impairments in the interaction with the environment. To this aim, BCI systems must correctly decode and interpret neurophysiological signals reflecting the intention of the subjects to move. Therefore, the accurate classification of single events in motor tasks represents a fundamental challenge in ensuring efficient communication and control between users and BCIs. Movement-associated changes in electroencephalographic (EEG) sensorimotor rhythms, such as event-related desynchronization (ERD), are well-known features of discriminating motor tasks. Fractal dimension (FD) can be used to evaluate the complexity and self-similarity in brain signals, potentially providing complementary information to frequency-based signal features. Methods: In the present work, we introduce FD as a novel feature for subject-independent event classification, and we test several machine learning (ML) models in behavioural tasks of motor imagery (MI) and motor execution (ME). Results: Our results show that FD improves the classification accuracy of ML compared to ERD. Furthermore, unilateral hand movements have higher classification accuracy than bilateral movements in both MI and ME tasks. Conclusions: These results provide further insights into subject-independent event classification in BCI systems and demonstrate the potential of FD as a discriminative feature for EEG signals.
2024
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11566/325413
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