Background: Decompressive craniectomy (DC) is still controversial in neurosurgery. According to the most recent trials, DC seems to increase survival in case of refractory intracranial pressure. On the other hand, the risk of postsurgical poor outcomes remain high. The present study aimed to evaluate a series of preoperative factors potentially impacting on long-term follow-up of traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients treated with DC. Methods: We analyzed the first follow-up year of a series of 75 TBI patients treated with DC at our department in five years (2015-2019). Demographic, clinical, and radiological parameters were retrospectively collected from clinical records. Blood examinations were analyzed to calculate the preoperative neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR). Disability rating scale (DRS) was used to classify patients' outcomes (good outcome [G.O.] if DRS ≤11 and poor outcome [P.O.] if DRS ≥12) at 6 and 12 months. Results: At six months follow-up, 25 out of 75 patients had DRS ≤11, while at 12 months, 30 out of 75 patients were included in the G.O. group . Admission Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) >8 was significantly associated with six months G.O. Increased NLR values and the interval between DC and cranioplasty >3 months were significantly correlated to a P.O. at 6- and 12-month follow-up. Conclusion: Since DC still represents a controversial therapeutic strategy, selecting parameters to help stratify TBI patients' potential outcomes is paramount. GCS at admission, the interval between DC and cranioplasty, and preoperative NLR values seem to correlate with the long-term outcome.

Post-traumatic decompressive craniectomy: Prognostic factors and long-term follow-up / Dobran, M.; Rienzo, A. D.; Carrassi, E.; Aiudi, D.; Raggi, A.; Iacoangeli, A.; Lattanzi, S.; Iacoangeli, M.. - In: SURGICAL NEUROLOGY INTERNATIONAL. - ISSN 2152-7806. - ELETTRONICO. - 14:(2023), pp. 1-7. [10.25259/SNI_1090_2022]

Post-traumatic decompressive craniectomy: Prognostic factors and long-term follow-up

Dobran M.
Conceptualization
;
Carrassi E.
Supervision
;
Aiudi D.
Writing – Original Draft Preparation
;
Raggi A.
Conceptualization
;
Iacoangeli A.
Investigation
;
Lattanzi S.
Writing – Original Draft Preparation
;
Iacoangeli M.
Visualization
2023-01-01

Abstract

Background: Decompressive craniectomy (DC) is still controversial in neurosurgery. According to the most recent trials, DC seems to increase survival in case of refractory intracranial pressure. On the other hand, the risk of postsurgical poor outcomes remain high. The present study aimed to evaluate a series of preoperative factors potentially impacting on long-term follow-up of traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients treated with DC. Methods: We analyzed the first follow-up year of a series of 75 TBI patients treated with DC at our department in five years (2015-2019). Demographic, clinical, and radiological parameters were retrospectively collected from clinical records. Blood examinations were analyzed to calculate the preoperative neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR). Disability rating scale (DRS) was used to classify patients' outcomes (good outcome [G.O.] if DRS ≤11 and poor outcome [P.O.] if DRS ≥12) at 6 and 12 months. Results: At six months follow-up, 25 out of 75 patients had DRS ≤11, while at 12 months, 30 out of 75 patients were included in the G.O. group . Admission Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) >8 was significantly associated with six months G.O. Increased NLR values and the interval between DC and cranioplasty >3 months were significantly correlated to a P.O. at 6- and 12-month follow-up. Conclusion: Since DC still represents a controversial therapeutic strategy, selecting parameters to help stratify TBI patients' potential outcomes is paramount. GCS at admission, the interval between DC and cranioplasty, and preoperative NLR values seem to correlate with the long-term outcome.
2023
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11566/324998
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