Introduction: The “lost penis syndrome” (LPS) is a term often used in non-clinical settings to describe the subjective perception of the loss of cutaneous and proprioceptive feelings of the male organ during vaginal penetration. Although deserving clinical attention, this syndrome did not receive any consideration in the medical literature. Notwithstanding, it represents a relatively unexceptional condition among patients in sexual medicine clinics, and it is often reported together with other sexual dysfunctions, especially delayed ejaculation, anejaculation, male anorgasmia and inability to maintain a full erection. Objectives: To draft a new conceptual characterization of the LPS, defined as a lack of penile somesthetic sensations during sexual penetration due to various causes and leading to several sexual consequences in both partners. Methods: Based on an extensive literature review and physiological assumptions, the mechanisms contributing to friction during penovaginal intercourse, and their correlation to LPS, have been explored, as well as other nonanatomical factors possibly contributing to the loss of penile sensations. Results: Efficient penile erection and sensitivity, optimal vaginal lubrication and trophism contribute to penovaginal friction. Whenever one of these processes does not occur, loss of penile sensation defined as LPS can occur. Sociocultural, psychopathological and age-related (ie, couplepause) factors are also implicated in the etiology. Four types of LPS emerged from the literature review: anatomical and/or functional, behavioral, psychopathological and iatrogenic. According to the subtype, a wide variety of treatments can be employed, including PDE5i, testosterone replacement therapy and vaginal cosmetic surgery, as well as targeted therapy for concomitant sexual comorbidity. Conclusion: We held up the mirror on LPS as a clinically existing multifactorial entity and provided medical features and hypotheses contributing to or causing the occurrence of LPS. In the light of a sociocultural and scientific perspective, we proposed a description and categorization of this syndrome hypothesizing its usefulness in daily clinical practice. Colonnello E, Limoncin E, Ciocca G, et al. The Lost Penis Syndrome: A New Clinical Entity in Sexual Medicine. Sex Med Rev 2022;10:113–129.

The Lost Penis Syndrome: A New Clinical Entity in Sexual Medicine / Colonnello, E.; Limoncin, E.; Ciocca, G.; Sansone, A.; Mollaioli, D.; Balercia, G.; Porst, H.; Zhang, H.; Yu, X.; Zhang, Y.; Jannini, E. A.. - In: SEXUAL MEDICINE REVIEWS. - ISSN 2050-0521. - 10:(2022), pp. 113-129. [10.1016/j.sxmr.2021.08.001]

The Lost Penis Syndrome: A New Clinical Entity in Sexual Medicine

Ciocca G.;Balercia G.;
2022-01-01

Abstract

Introduction: The “lost penis syndrome” (LPS) is a term often used in non-clinical settings to describe the subjective perception of the loss of cutaneous and proprioceptive feelings of the male organ during vaginal penetration. Although deserving clinical attention, this syndrome did not receive any consideration in the medical literature. Notwithstanding, it represents a relatively unexceptional condition among patients in sexual medicine clinics, and it is often reported together with other sexual dysfunctions, especially delayed ejaculation, anejaculation, male anorgasmia and inability to maintain a full erection. Objectives: To draft a new conceptual characterization of the LPS, defined as a lack of penile somesthetic sensations during sexual penetration due to various causes and leading to several sexual consequences in both partners. Methods: Based on an extensive literature review and physiological assumptions, the mechanisms contributing to friction during penovaginal intercourse, and their correlation to LPS, have been explored, as well as other nonanatomical factors possibly contributing to the loss of penile sensations. Results: Efficient penile erection and sensitivity, optimal vaginal lubrication and trophism contribute to penovaginal friction. Whenever one of these processes does not occur, loss of penile sensation defined as LPS can occur. Sociocultural, psychopathological and age-related (ie, couplepause) factors are also implicated in the etiology. Four types of LPS emerged from the literature review: anatomical and/or functional, behavioral, psychopathological and iatrogenic. According to the subtype, a wide variety of treatments can be employed, including PDE5i, testosterone replacement therapy and vaginal cosmetic surgery, as well as targeted therapy for concomitant sexual comorbidity. Conclusion: We held up the mirror on LPS as a clinically existing multifactorial entity and provided medical features and hypotheses contributing to or causing the occurrence of LPS. In the light of a sociocultural and scientific perspective, we proposed a description and categorization of this syndrome hypothesizing its usefulness in daily clinical practice. Colonnello E, Limoncin E, Ciocca G, et al. The Lost Penis Syndrome: A New Clinical Entity in Sexual Medicine. Sex Med Rev 2022;10:113–129.
2022
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11566/294523
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