Insects represent a valuable and sustainable alternative ingredient for aquafeed formulation. However, insect-based diets have often highlighted controversial results in different fish species, especially when high inclusion levels were used. Several studies have demonstrated that nutritional programming through parental feeding may allow the production of fish better adapted to use sub-optimal aquafeed ingredients. To date, this approach has never been explored on insect-based diets. In the present study, five experimental diets characterized by increasing fish meal substitution levels with full-fat Black Soldier Fly (Hermetia illucens; BSF) prepupae meal (0%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 100%) were used to investigate the effects of programming via broodstock nutrition on F1 zebrafish larvae development. The responses of offspring were assayed through biometric, gas chromatographic, histological, and molecular analyses. The results evidenced that the same BSF-based diets provided to adults were able to affect F1 zebrafish larvae fatty acid composition without impairing growth performances, hepatic lipid accumulation and gut health. Groups challenged with higher BSF inclusion with respect to fish meal (50%, 75% and 100%) showed a significant downregulation of stress response markers and a positive modulation of inflammatory cytokines gene expression. The present study evidences that nutritional programming through parental feeding may make it possible to extend the fish meal substitution level with BSF prepupae meal in the diet up to almost 100% without incurring the well-known negative side effects of BSF-based diets

Possible Dietary Effects of Insect-Based Diets across Zebrafish (Danio rerio) Generations: A Multidisciplinary Study on the Larval Phase / Zarantoniello, Matteo; Randazzo, Basilio; Cardinaletti, Gloriana; Truzzi, Cristina; Chemello, Giulia; Riolo, Paola; Olivotto, Ike. - In: ANIMALS. - ISSN 2076-2615. - ELETTRONICO. - 11:3(2021), p. 751. [10.3390/ani11030751]

Possible Dietary Effects of Insect-Based Diets across Zebrafish (Danio rerio) Generations: A Multidisciplinary Study on the Larval Phase

Zarantoniello, Matteo;Randazzo, Basilio;Truzzi, Cristina;Chemello, Giulia;Riolo, Paola;Olivotto, Ike
2021-01-01

Abstract

Insects represent a valuable and sustainable alternative ingredient for aquafeed formulation. However, insect-based diets have often highlighted controversial results in different fish species, especially when high inclusion levels were used. Several studies have demonstrated that nutritional programming through parental feeding may allow the production of fish better adapted to use sub-optimal aquafeed ingredients. To date, this approach has never been explored on insect-based diets. In the present study, five experimental diets characterized by increasing fish meal substitution levels with full-fat Black Soldier Fly (Hermetia illucens; BSF) prepupae meal (0%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 100%) were used to investigate the effects of programming via broodstock nutrition on F1 zebrafish larvae development. The responses of offspring were assayed through biometric, gas chromatographic, histological, and molecular analyses. The results evidenced that the same BSF-based diets provided to adults were able to affect F1 zebrafish larvae fatty acid composition without impairing growth performances, hepatic lipid accumulation and gut health. Groups challenged with higher BSF inclusion with respect to fish meal (50%, 75% and 100%) showed a significant downregulation of stress response markers and a positive modulation of inflammatory cytokines gene expression. The present study evidences that nutritional programming through parental feeding may make it possible to extend the fish meal substitution level with BSF prepupae meal in the diet up to almost 100% without incurring the well-known negative side effects of BSF-based diets
2021
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11566/288693
 Attenzione

Attenzione! I dati visualizzati non sono stati sottoposti a validazione da parte dell'ateneo

Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 14
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 13
social impact