Purpose. The present study concerns the production and characterization of monooleine (MO) dispersions as drug delivery systems for indomethacin, taken as model anti-inflammatory drug. Methods. Dispersions were produced by emulsification and homogenization of MO and poloxamer in water. Morphology and dimensional distribution of the disperse phase have been characterized by cryotransmission electron microscopy and photon correlation spectroscopy, respectively. X-ray diffraction has been performed to determine the structural organization of the disperse phase. Sedimentation field flow fractionation (SdFFF) has been performed to investigate drug distribution in the dispersion. An in vitro diffusion study was conducted by Franz cell associated to stratum corneum epidermis membrane on cubosome dispersions viscosized by carbomer. In vivo studies based on skin reflectance spectrophotometry and tape stripping were performed to better investigate the performance of cubosome as indomethacin delivery system. Results. Microscopy studies showed the coexistence of vesicles and cubosomes. X-ray diffraction revealed the presence of a bicontinuous cubic phase of spatial symmetry Im3m (Q229). SdFFF demonstrated that no free drug was present in the dispersion. Indomethacin incorporated in viscosized MO dispersions exhibited a lower flux with respect to the analogous formulation containing the free drug in the aqueous phase and to the control formulation based on carbomer gel. Reflectance spectroscopy demonstrated that indomethacin incorporated into MO dispersions can be released in a prolonged fashion. Tape-stripping experiments corroborated this finding. Conclusions. MO dispersions can be proposed as nanoparticulate systems able to control the percutaneous absorption of indomethacin.

Cubosome dispersions as delivery systems for percutaneous administration of indomethacin / E., Esposito; R., Cortesi; M., Drechsler; L., Paccamiccio; Mariani, Paolo; C., Contado; E., Stellin; E., Menegatti; F., Bonina; C., Puglia. - In: PHARMACEUTICAL RESEARCH. - ISSN 0724-8741. - STAMPA. - 22:(2005), pp. 2163-2173. [10.1007/s11095-005-8176-x]

Cubosome dispersions as delivery systems for percutaneous administration of indomethacin

MARIANI, Paolo;
2005-01-01

Abstract

Purpose. The present study concerns the production and characterization of monooleine (MO) dispersions as drug delivery systems for indomethacin, taken as model anti-inflammatory drug. Methods. Dispersions were produced by emulsification and homogenization of MO and poloxamer in water. Morphology and dimensional distribution of the disperse phase have been characterized by cryotransmission electron microscopy and photon correlation spectroscopy, respectively. X-ray diffraction has been performed to determine the structural organization of the disperse phase. Sedimentation field flow fractionation (SdFFF) has been performed to investigate drug distribution in the dispersion. An in vitro diffusion study was conducted by Franz cell associated to stratum corneum epidermis membrane on cubosome dispersions viscosized by carbomer. In vivo studies based on skin reflectance spectrophotometry and tape stripping were performed to better investigate the performance of cubosome as indomethacin delivery system. Results. Microscopy studies showed the coexistence of vesicles and cubosomes. X-ray diffraction revealed the presence of a bicontinuous cubic phase of spatial symmetry Im3m (Q229). SdFFF demonstrated that no free drug was present in the dispersion. Indomethacin incorporated in viscosized MO dispersions exhibited a lower flux with respect to the analogous formulation containing the free drug in the aqueous phase and to the control formulation based on carbomer gel. Reflectance spectroscopy demonstrated that indomethacin incorporated into MO dispersions can be released in a prolonged fashion. Tape-stripping experiments corroborated this finding. Conclusions. MO dispersions can be proposed as nanoparticulate systems able to control the percutaneous absorption of indomethacin.
2005
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11566/33216
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