ABSTRACT The paper aims to analyse the behaviour of a battery of non-survey techniques of constructing regional I-O tables in estimating impact. For this aim, a Monte Carlo simulation, based on the generation of ‘true’ multiregional I-O tables, was carried out. By aggregating multi-regional I-O tables, national I-O tables were obtained. From the latter, indirect regional tables were derived through the application of various regionalisation methods and the relevant multipliers were compared with the ‘true’ multipliers using a set of statistics. Three aspects of the behaviour of the methods have been analysed: performances to reproduce ‘true’ multipliers, variability of simulation error and direction of bias. The results have demonstrated that the Flegg et al. Location Quotient (FLQ) and its augmented version (AFLQ) represent an effective improvement of conventional techniques based on the use of location quotients in both reproducing ‘true’ multipliers and generating more stable simulation errors. In addition, the results have confirmed the existence of a tendency of the methods to over/underestimate impact. In the cases of the FLQ and the AFLQ, this tendency depends on the value of the parameter d.

Assessing the Behavior of Non-Survey Methods for Constructing Regional Input-Output Tables through a Monte Carlo Simulation

CHELLI, Francesco Maria;
2008

Abstract

ABSTRACT The paper aims to analyse the behaviour of a battery of non-survey techniques of constructing regional I-O tables in estimating impact. For this aim, a Monte Carlo simulation, based on the generation of ‘true’ multiregional I-O tables, was carried out. By aggregating multi-regional I-O tables, national I-O tables were obtained. From the latter, indirect regional tables were derived through the application of various regionalisation methods and the relevant multipliers were compared with the ‘true’ multipliers using a set of statistics. Three aspects of the behaviour of the methods have been analysed: performances to reproduce ‘true’ multipliers, variability of simulation error and direction of bias. The results have demonstrated that the Flegg et al. Location Quotient (FLQ) and its augmented version (AFLQ) represent an effective improvement of conventional techniques based on the use of location quotients in both reproducing ‘true’ multipliers and generating more stable simulation errors. In addition, the results have confirmed the existence of a tendency of the methods to over/underestimate impact. In the cases of the FLQ and the AFLQ, this tendency depends on the value of the parameter d.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11566/31996
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