: Multiple sclerosis (MS) represents the most common acquired demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system (CNS). Its pathogenesis, in parallel with the well-established role of mechanisms pertaining to autoimmunity, involves several key functions of immune, glial and nerve cells. The disease's natural history is complex, heterogeneous and may evolve over a relapsing-remitting (RRMS) or progressive (PPMS/SPMS) course. Acute inflammation, driven by infiltration of peripheral cells in the CNS, is thought to be the most relevant process during the earliest phases and in RRMS, while disruption in glial and neural cells of pathways pertaining to energy metabolism, survival cascades, synaptic and ionic homeostasis are thought to be mostly relevant in long-standing disease, such as in progressive forms. In this complex scenario, many mechanisms originally thought to be distinctive of neurodegenerative disorders are being increasingly recognized as crucial from the beginning of the disease. The present review aims at highlighting mechanisms in common between MS, autoimmune diseases and biology of neurodegenerative disorders. In fact, there is an unmet need to explore new targets that might be involved as master regulators of autoimmunity, inflammation and survival of nerve cells.

Multiple Sclerosis: Inflammatory and Neuroglial Aspects / Papiri, Giulio; D'Andreamatteo, Giordano; Cacchiò, Gabriella; Alia, Sonila; Silvestrini, Mauro; Paci, Cristina; Luzzi, Simona; Vignini, Arianna. - In: CURRENT ISSUES IN MOLECULAR BIOLOGY. - ISSN 1467-3045. - 45:2(2023), pp. 1443-1470. [10.3390/cimb45020094]

Multiple Sclerosis: Inflammatory and Neuroglial Aspects

Papiri, Giulio;Alia, Sonila;Silvestrini, Mauro;Paci, Cristina;Luzzi, Simona;Vignini, Arianna
2023-01-01

Abstract

: Multiple sclerosis (MS) represents the most common acquired demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system (CNS). Its pathogenesis, in parallel with the well-established role of mechanisms pertaining to autoimmunity, involves several key functions of immune, glial and nerve cells. The disease's natural history is complex, heterogeneous and may evolve over a relapsing-remitting (RRMS) or progressive (PPMS/SPMS) course. Acute inflammation, driven by infiltration of peripheral cells in the CNS, is thought to be the most relevant process during the earliest phases and in RRMS, while disruption in glial and neural cells of pathways pertaining to energy metabolism, survival cascades, synaptic and ionic homeostasis are thought to be mostly relevant in long-standing disease, such as in progressive forms. In this complex scenario, many mechanisms originally thought to be distinctive of neurodegenerative disorders are being increasingly recognized as crucial from the beginning of the disease. The present review aims at highlighting mechanisms in common between MS, autoimmune diseases and biology of neurodegenerative disorders. In fact, there is an unmet need to explore new targets that might be involved as master regulators of autoimmunity, inflammation and survival of nerve cells.
2023
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11566/312233
 Attenzione

Attenzione! I dati visualizzati non sono stati sottoposti a validazione da parte dell'ateneo

Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 1
  • Scopus 8
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 5
social impact