Since the traditional mental health system showed significant limitations in the early identification, diagnosis and treatment of the current new youth psychopathological trajectories, by substantially failing in targeting the needs of the current young generation, there is the demand to redesign and digitally adapt youth mental health care and systems. Indeed, the level of digital literacy and the level of digital competency and knowledge in the field of digital psychiatry is still under-investigated among mental health professionals, particularly in youth mental health. Therefore, we aimed at: (a) carrying out a post-hoc analysis of an international multi-centre study, to investigate the opinions of mental health professionals regarding the feasibility, efficacy and clinical experience in delivering digital mental health interventions (DMHIs) in youths; (b) providing a comprehensive overview on the integrated digitally-based youth mental health care models and innovations. Mental health professionals declared the lack of a formal training in digital psychiatry, particularly in youth mental health. Subjects who received a formal theoretical/practical training on DMHIs displayed a statistical trend towards a positive feasibility of digital psychiatry in youth mental health (p = 0.053) and a perceived increased efficacy of digital psychiatry in youths (p = 0.051). Respondents with higher Digital Psychiatry Opinion (DPO) scores reported a positive perceived feasibility of DMHIs in youths (p < 0.041) and are more prone to deliver DMHIs to young people (p < 0.001). Respondents with higher knowledge scores (KS) declared that DMHIs are more effective in youth mental health (p < 0.001). Overall, the digitalisation indeed allowed young people to keep in touch with a mental health professional, facilitating a more dynamic and fluid mental health care access and monitoring, generally preferred and considered more feasible by post-Millennial youngsters. Accordingly, our findings demonstrated that mental health professionals are more prone to offer DMHIs in youth mental health, particularly whether previously trained and knowledgeable on the topic.

The role of digital tools in providing youth mental health: results from an international multi-center study

Orsolini, L;Appignanesi, C;Pompili, S;Volpe, U
2022

Abstract

Since the traditional mental health system showed significant limitations in the early identification, diagnosis and treatment of the current new youth psychopathological trajectories, by substantially failing in targeting the needs of the current young generation, there is the demand to redesign and digitally adapt youth mental health care and systems. Indeed, the level of digital literacy and the level of digital competency and knowledge in the field of digital psychiatry is still under-investigated among mental health professionals, particularly in youth mental health. Therefore, we aimed at: (a) carrying out a post-hoc analysis of an international multi-centre study, to investigate the opinions of mental health professionals regarding the feasibility, efficacy and clinical experience in delivering digital mental health interventions (DMHIs) in youths; (b) providing a comprehensive overview on the integrated digitally-based youth mental health care models and innovations. Mental health professionals declared the lack of a formal training in digital psychiatry, particularly in youth mental health. Subjects who received a formal theoretical/practical training on DMHIs displayed a statistical trend towards a positive feasibility of digital psychiatry in youth mental health (p = 0.053) and a perceived increased efficacy of digital psychiatry in youths (p = 0.051). Respondents with higher Digital Psychiatry Opinion (DPO) scores reported a positive perceived feasibility of DMHIs in youths (p < 0.041) and are more prone to deliver DMHIs to young people (p < 0.001). Respondents with higher knowledge scores (KS) declared that DMHIs are more effective in youth mental health (p < 0.001). Overall, the digitalisation indeed allowed young people to keep in touch with a mental health professional, facilitating a more dynamic and fluid mental health care access and monitoring, generally preferred and considered more feasible by post-Millennial youngsters. Accordingly, our findings demonstrated that mental health professionals are more prone to offer DMHIs in youth mental health, particularly whether previously trained and knowledgeable on the topic.
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11566/306374
 Attenzione

Attenzione! I dati visualizzati non sono stati sottoposti a validazione da parte dell'ateneo

Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus ND
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 0
social impact