Nowadays, the use of wearable devices is spreading in different fields of application, such as healthcare, digital health, and sports monitoring. In sport applications, the present trend is to continuously monitor the athletes’ physiological parameters during training or competitions to maximize performance and support coaches. This paper aims to evaluate the performances in heart rate assessment, in terms of accuracy and precision, of both wrist-worn and chest-strap commercial devices used during swimming activity, considering a test population of 10 expert swimmers. Three devices were employed: Polar H10 cardiac belt, Polar Vantage V2, and Garmin Venu Sq smartwatches. The former was used as a reference device to validate the data measured by the two smartwatches. Tests were performed both in dry and wet conditions, considering walking/running on a treadmill and different swimming styles in water, respectively. The measurement accuracy and precision were evaluated through standard methods, i.e., Bland–Altman plot, analysis of deviations, and Pearson’s correlation coefficient. Results show that both precision and accuracy worsen during swimming activity (with an absolute increase of the measurement deviation in the range of 13–56 bpm for mean value and 49–52 bpm for standard deviation), proving how water and arms movement act as relevant interference inputs. Moreover, it was found that wearable performance decreases when activity intensity increases, highlighting the need for specific research for wearable applications in water, with a particular focus on swimming-related sports activities

Accuracy and Precision of Wearable Devices for Real-Time Monitoring of Swimming Athletes / Cosoli, Gloria; Antognoli, Luca; Veroli, Valentina; Scalise, Lorenzo. - In: SENSORS. - ISSN 1424-8220. - ELETTRONICO. - 22:13(2022), p. 4726. [10.3390/s22134726]

Accuracy and Precision of Wearable Devices for Real-Time Monitoring of Swimming Athletes

Cosoli, Gloria
;
Antognoli, Luca;Scalise, Lorenzo
2022-01-01

Abstract

Nowadays, the use of wearable devices is spreading in different fields of application, such as healthcare, digital health, and sports monitoring. In sport applications, the present trend is to continuously monitor the athletes’ physiological parameters during training or competitions to maximize performance and support coaches. This paper aims to evaluate the performances in heart rate assessment, in terms of accuracy and precision, of both wrist-worn and chest-strap commercial devices used during swimming activity, considering a test population of 10 expert swimmers. Three devices were employed: Polar H10 cardiac belt, Polar Vantage V2, and Garmin Venu Sq smartwatches. The former was used as a reference device to validate the data measured by the two smartwatches. Tests were performed both in dry and wet conditions, considering walking/running on a treadmill and different swimming styles in water, respectively. The measurement accuracy and precision were evaluated through standard methods, i.e., Bland–Altman plot, analysis of deviations, and Pearson’s correlation coefficient. Results show that both precision and accuracy worsen during swimming activity (with an absolute increase of the measurement deviation in the range of 13–56 bpm for mean value and 49–52 bpm for standard deviation), proving how water and arms movement act as relevant interference inputs. Moreover, it was found that wearable performance decreases when activity intensity increases, highlighting the need for specific research for wearable applications in water, with a particular focus on swimming-related sports activities
2022
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11566/304120
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