Introduction: Breast reduction is one of the most common procedures performed by plastic surgeons worldwide. Despite that several techniques have been proposed for management of ptotic or hypertrophic breasts, most of them often deal with too large breast bases, poor breast projection, persistent “dog ears,” and a certain percentage of bottoming out. Lower-pole shaping of the breast remains one of the challenge of vertical mammoplasty. Materials and Methods: The authors report their 5-year-long experience with a modification of the vertical scar technique, the “arrow flap,” in which they harvest a double lateral glandular and cutaneous flap, to tighten and better shape the base of the breast and to improve the breast projection with a “double-bra” effect. From April 2015 to February 2019, 75 patients with moderate to severe macromastia/breast ptosis underwent bilateral reduction mammoplasty. Results: Postoperative outcomes showed an overall satisfactory results and low incidence of complications. Two patients presented with an asymmetry between the 2 breasts, and no nipple-areola complex necrosis occurred. One patient reported a wider vertical scar, whereas no bottoming out was observed. Conclusions: All patients reported a stable and durable projection of the breast, with pleasant cosmetic results. By combining short scars and narrow base, we can obtain a pleasant lower pole reshaping of the breast, even in that challenging cases of large and squared breast. The authors believe that this technique provides a useful surgical option, increasing the versatility of the superior pedicle vertical mammaplasty both for mastopexy and breast reduction, even in cases of severe macromastia.

The “arrow flap” technique in reduction mammaplasty: Combining short scars, narrow base, and high and persistent breast projection

Torresetti M.
;
Scalise A.;Di Benedetto G.
2021

Abstract

Introduction: Breast reduction is one of the most common procedures performed by plastic surgeons worldwide. Despite that several techniques have been proposed for management of ptotic or hypertrophic breasts, most of them often deal with too large breast bases, poor breast projection, persistent “dog ears,” and a certain percentage of bottoming out. Lower-pole shaping of the breast remains one of the challenge of vertical mammoplasty. Materials and Methods: The authors report their 5-year-long experience with a modification of the vertical scar technique, the “arrow flap,” in which they harvest a double lateral glandular and cutaneous flap, to tighten and better shape the base of the breast and to improve the breast projection with a “double-bra” effect. From April 2015 to February 2019, 75 patients with moderate to severe macromastia/breast ptosis underwent bilateral reduction mammoplasty. Results: Postoperative outcomes showed an overall satisfactory results and low incidence of complications. Two patients presented with an asymmetry between the 2 breasts, and no nipple-areola complex necrosis occurred. One patient reported a wider vertical scar, whereas no bottoming out was observed. Conclusions: All patients reported a stable and durable projection of the breast, with pleasant cosmetic results. By combining short scars and narrow base, we can obtain a pleasant lower pole reshaping of the breast, even in that challenging cases of large and squared breast. The authors believe that this technique provides a useful surgical option, increasing the versatility of the superior pedicle vertical mammaplasty both for mastopexy and breast reduction, even in cases of severe macromastia.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11566/301586
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