Hypothalamic dysfunction is an initial event following diet-induced obesity, primarily involving areas regulating energy balance such as arcuate nucleus (Arc) and median eminence (ME). To gain insights into the early hypothalamic diet-induced alterations, adult CD1 mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD) for 6 weeks were studied and compared with normo-fed controls. Transmission and scanning electron microscopy and histological staining were employed for morphological studies of the ME, while Raman spectroscopy was applied for the biochemical analysis of the Arc-ME complex. In HFD mice, ME β2-tanycytes, glial cells dedicated to blood-liquor crosstalk, exhibited remarkable ultrastructural anomalies, including altered alignment, reduced junctions, degenerating organelles, and higher content of lipid droplets, lysosomes, and autophagosomes. Degenerating tanycytes also displayed an electron transparent cytoplasm filled with numerous vesicles, and they were surrounded by dilated extracellular spaces extending up to the subependymal layer. Consistently, Raman spectroscopy analysis of the Arc-ME complex revealed higher glycogen, collagen, and lipid bands in HFD mice compared with controls, and there was also a higher band corresponding to the cyanide group in the former compared to the last. Collectively, these data show that ME β2-tanycytes exhibit early structural and chemical alterations due to HFD and reveal for the first-time hypothalamic cyanide presence following high dietary lipids consumption, which is a novel aspect with potential implications in the field of obesity.

High-Fat Diet Impairs Mouse Median Eminence: A Study by Transmission and Scanning Electron Microscopy Coupled with Raman Spectroscopy

Ilenia Severi
Primo
Conceptualization
;
Georgia Colleluori
Conceptualization
;
Martina Senzacqua
Methodology
;
Angelica Di Vincenzo
Methodology
;
Giorgio Barbatelli
Supervision
;
Fabrizio Fiori
Supervision
;
Antonio Giordano
Project Administration
2021-01-01

Abstract

Hypothalamic dysfunction is an initial event following diet-induced obesity, primarily involving areas regulating energy balance such as arcuate nucleus (Arc) and median eminence (ME). To gain insights into the early hypothalamic diet-induced alterations, adult CD1 mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD) for 6 weeks were studied and compared with normo-fed controls. Transmission and scanning electron microscopy and histological staining were employed for morphological studies of the ME, while Raman spectroscopy was applied for the biochemical analysis of the Arc-ME complex. In HFD mice, ME β2-tanycytes, glial cells dedicated to blood-liquor crosstalk, exhibited remarkable ultrastructural anomalies, including altered alignment, reduced junctions, degenerating organelles, and higher content of lipid droplets, lysosomes, and autophagosomes. Degenerating tanycytes also displayed an electron transparent cytoplasm filled with numerous vesicles, and they were surrounded by dilated extracellular spaces extending up to the subependymal layer. Consistently, Raman spectroscopy analysis of the Arc-ME complex revealed higher glycogen, collagen, and lipid bands in HFD mice compared with controls, and there was also a higher band corresponding to the cyanide group in the former compared to the last. Collectively, these data show that ME β2-tanycytes exhibit early structural and chemical alterations due to HFD and reveal for the first-time hypothalamic cyanide presence following high dietary lipids consumption, which is a novel aspect with potential implications in the field of obesity.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11566/291629
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