Symmetric and well-organized connective tissues around the longitudinal implant axis were hypothesized to decrease early bone resorption by reducing inflammatory cell infiltration. Previous studies that referred to the connective tissue around implant and abutments were based on two-dimensional investigations; however, only advanced three-dimensional characterizations could evidence the organization of connective tissue microarchitecture in the attempt of finding new strategies to reduce inflammatory cell infiltration. We retrieved three implants with a cone morse implant–abutment connection from patients; they were investigated by high-resolution X-ray phase-contrast microtomography, cross-linking the obtained information with histologic results. We observed transverse and longitudinal orientated collagen bundles intertwining with each other. In the longitudinal planes, it was observed that the closer the fiber bundles were to the implant, the more symmetric and regular their course was. The transverse bundles of collagen fibers were observed as semicircular, intersecting in the lamina propria of the mucosa and ending in the oral epithelium. No collagen fibers were found radial to the implant surface. This intertwining three-dimensional pattern seems to favor the stabilization of the soft tissues around the implants, preventing inflammatory cell apical migration and, consequently, preventing bone resorption and implant failure. This fact, according to the authors’ best knowledge, has never been reported in the literature and might be due to the physical forces acting on fibroblasts and on the collagen produced by the fibroblasts themselves, in areas close to the implant and to the symmetric geometry of the implant itself.

The symmetric 3D organization of connective tissue around implant abutment: a key-issue to prevent bone resorption

Michele Furlani
Investigation
;
Alessandra Giuliani
Conceptualization
2021

Abstract

Symmetric and well-organized connective tissues around the longitudinal implant axis were hypothesized to decrease early bone resorption by reducing inflammatory cell infiltration. Previous studies that referred to the connective tissue around implant and abutments were based on two-dimensional investigations; however, only advanced three-dimensional characterizations could evidence the organization of connective tissue microarchitecture in the attempt of finding new strategies to reduce inflammatory cell infiltration. We retrieved three implants with a cone morse implant–abutment connection from patients; they were investigated by high-resolution X-ray phase-contrast microtomography, cross-linking the obtained information with histologic results. We observed transverse and longitudinal orientated collagen bundles intertwining with each other. In the longitudinal planes, it was observed that the closer the fiber bundles were to the implant, the more symmetric and regular their course was. The transverse bundles of collagen fibers were observed as semicircular, intersecting in the lamina propria of the mucosa and ending in the oral epithelium. No collagen fibers were found radial to the implant surface. This intertwining three-dimensional pattern seems to favor the stabilization of the soft tissues around the implants, preventing inflammatory cell apical migration and, consequently, preventing bone resorption and implant failure. This fact, according to the authors’ best knowledge, has never been reported in the literature and might be due to the physical forces acting on fibroblasts and on the collagen produced by the fibroblasts themselves, in areas close to the implant and to the symmetric geometry of the implant itself.
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
symmetry-13-01126-v2.pdf

accesso aperto

Tipologia: Documento in Post-print
Licenza: Creative commons
Dimensione 4.41 MB
Formato Adobe PDF
4.41 MB Adobe PDF Visualizza/Apri

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11566/290696
 Attenzione

Attenzione! I dati visualizzati non sono stati sottoposti a validazione da parte dell'ateneo

Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 0
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 0
social impact