Fertilization is required for optimum plant growth, particularly in unfertile soils, while optimizing nutrient use efficiency is an alternative to reduce inorganic fertilizer needs and reduce environmental problems caused by nutrient leaching. This study investigated soil properties and cowpea yield responses to biochars (BCs) made from different feedstocks, baby corn peel biochar (BC1), branches of mango tree biochar (BC2), and rice husk biochar (BC3), applied in combination with nitrogen-phosphorus-potassium (NPK) fertilizers. The experiment was conducted in a greenhouse, using an acid sandy soil (Arenosol) that was submitted for 70 d to the following eight treatments: i) control; ii) full dose of NPK (a commercial compound fertilizer (12-24-12 of N-P2O5-K2O) + urea (46% N)); iii) BC1 + half dose of NPK; iv) BC1 + full dose of NPK; v) BC2 + half dose of NPK; vi) BC2 + full dose of NPK; vii) BC3 + half dose of NPK; and viii) BC3 + full dose of NPK. All biochars were applied at a rate of 0.9% (weight/weight), and each type of biochar was combined with half and full doses of NPK fertilizers. Soil pH increased significantly (P < 0:05) in treatments with BC1 and BC2, while cation exchange capacity (CEC) and available P were higher in the treatments with BC1; BC1 and BC2 also induced higher activity of enzymes related to the P cycle and higher cowpea yield. Similar soil properties and cowpea yield parameters were obtained with the full and half doses of NPK fertilizers for each type of biochar used. In conclusion, biochars in the combination with NPK fertilizers improved soil chemistry and enzymatic activities, allowing reduced fertilizer application and food production costs in the acid soil studied.

Benefits of Biochars and NPK Fertilizers for Soil Quality and Growth of Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L. Walp.) in an Acid Arenosol

COCCO, Stefania;RUELLO, Maria Letizia;CORTI, Giuseppe
2019-01-01

Abstract

Fertilization is required for optimum plant growth, particularly in unfertile soils, while optimizing nutrient use efficiency is an alternative to reduce inorganic fertilizer needs and reduce environmental problems caused by nutrient leaching. This study investigated soil properties and cowpea yield responses to biochars (BCs) made from different feedstocks, baby corn peel biochar (BC1), branches of mango tree biochar (BC2), and rice husk biochar (BC3), applied in combination with nitrogen-phosphorus-potassium (NPK) fertilizers. The experiment was conducted in a greenhouse, using an acid sandy soil (Arenosol) that was submitted for 70 d to the following eight treatments: i) control; ii) full dose of NPK (a commercial compound fertilizer (12-24-12 of N-P2O5-K2O) + urea (46% N)); iii) BC1 + half dose of NPK; iv) BC1 + full dose of NPK; v) BC2 + half dose of NPK; vi) BC2 + full dose of NPK; vii) BC3 + half dose of NPK; and viii) BC3 + full dose of NPK. All biochars were applied at a rate of 0.9% (weight/weight), and each type of biochar was combined with half and full doses of NPK fertilizers. Soil pH increased significantly (P < 0:05) in treatments with BC1 and BC2, while cation exchange capacity (CEC) and available P were higher in the treatments with BC1; BC1 and BC2 also induced higher activity of enzymes related to the P cycle and higher cowpea yield. Similar soil properties and cowpea yield parameters were obtained with the full and half doses of NPK fertilizers for each type of biochar used. In conclusion, biochars in the combination with NPK fertilizers improved soil chemistry and enzymatic activities, allowing reduced fertilizer application and food production costs in the acid soil studied.
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11566/270797
 Attenzione

Attenzione! I dati visualizzati non sono stati sottoposti a validazione da parte dell'ateneo

Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 25
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 23
social impact