We aimed to assess the impact of image quality on microcirculatory evaluation with sidestream dark-field (SDF) videomicroscopy in critically ill patients and explore factors associated with low video quality. This was a retrospective analysis of a single-centre prospective observational study. Videos of the sublingual microcirculation were recorded using SDF videomicroscopy in 100 adult patients within 12 h from admittance to the intensive care unit and every 24 h until discharge/death. Parameters of vessel density and perfusion were calculated offline for small vessels. For all videos, a quality score (-12 = unacceptable, 1 = suboptimal, 2 = optimal) was assigned for brightness, focus, content, stability, pressure and duration. Videos with a total score ≤8 were deemed as unacceptable. A total of 2455 videos (853 triplets) was analysed. Quality was acceptable in 56 % of videos. Lower quality was associated with worse microvascular density and perfusion. Unreliable triplets (≥1 unacceptable or missing video, 65 % of total) showed lower vessel density, worse perfusion and higher flow heterogeneity as compared to reliable triplets (p < 0.001). Quality was higher among triplets collected by an extensively-experienced investigator or in patients receiving sedation or mechanical ventilation. Perfused vessel density was higher in patients with Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) ≤8 (18.9 ± 4.5 vs. 17.0 ± 3.9 mm/mm(2) in those with GCS >8, p < 0.001) or requiring mechanical ventilation (18.0 ± 4.5 vs. 17.2 ± 3.8 mm/mm(2) in not mechanically ventilated patients, p = 0.059). We concluded that SDF video quality depends on both the operator's experience and patient's cooperation. Low-quality videos may produce spurious data, leading to an overestimation of microvascular alterations.

Impact of microcirculatory video quality on the evaluation of sublingual microcirculation in critically ill patients

DAMIANI, ELISA;SCORCELLA, CLAUDIA;DOMIZI, ROBERTA;CARSETTI, ANDREA;MININNO, NICOLETTA;PIERANTOZZI, SILVIA;ADRARIO, Erica;ROMANO, Rocco;PELAIA, Paolo;DONATI, Abele
2017-01-01

Abstract

We aimed to assess the impact of image quality on microcirculatory evaluation with sidestream dark-field (SDF) videomicroscopy in critically ill patients and explore factors associated with low video quality. This was a retrospective analysis of a single-centre prospective observational study. Videos of the sublingual microcirculation were recorded using SDF videomicroscopy in 100 adult patients within 12 h from admittance to the intensive care unit and every 24 h until discharge/death. Parameters of vessel density and perfusion were calculated offline for small vessels. For all videos, a quality score (-12 = unacceptable, 1 = suboptimal, 2 = optimal) was assigned for brightness, focus, content, stability, pressure and duration. Videos with a total score ≤8 were deemed as unacceptable. A total of 2455 videos (853 triplets) was analysed. Quality was acceptable in 56 % of videos. Lower quality was associated with worse microvascular density and perfusion. Unreliable triplets (≥1 unacceptable or missing video, 65 % of total) showed lower vessel density, worse perfusion and higher flow heterogeneity as compared to reliable triplets (p < 0.001). Quality was higher among triplets collected by an extensively-experienced investigator or in patients receiving sedation or mechanical ventilation. Perfused vessel density was higher in patients with Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) ≤8 (18.9 ± 4.5 vs. 17.0 ± 3.9 mm/mm(2) in those with GCS >8, p < 0.001) or requiring mechanical ventilation (18.0 ± 4.5 vs. 17.2 ± 3.8 mm/mm(2) in not mechanically ventilated patients, p = 0.059). We concluded that SDF video quality depends on both the operator's experience and patient's cooperation. Low-quality videos may produce spurious data, leading to an overestimation of microvascular alterations.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11566/236656
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