OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of the new antiepileptic drug brivaracetam (BRV) as add-on treatment for drug-resistant partial epilepsy using meta-analytical techniques. METHODS: Randomized, placebo-controlled, single- or double-blind, add-on trials of BRV in adult patients with drug-resistant partial epilepsy were identified through a systematic literature search. The following outcomes were assessed: 50% or greater reduction in seizure frequency, seizure freedom, incidence of treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs), and treatment withdrawal. Risk ratio (RR) with 95% confidence interval was estimated for each outcome. RESULTS: Six trials were included involving 2,399 participants according to the intent-to-treat, 1,715 for BRV, and 684 for placebo groups, respectively. The pooled RRs for the 50% responders and seizure freedom were 1.79 (1.51-2.12) and 4.74 (2.00-11.25), respectively. The subanalysis by levetiracetam (LEV) status did not show a statistically significant difference in the 50% responder rate when comparing BRV with placebo in patients with concomitant assumption of LEV. The TEAEs significantly associated with BRV were irritability (2.99 [1.28-6.97]), fatigue (2.19 [1.44-3.33]), somnolence (1.97 [1.45-2.68]), and dizziness (1.66 [1.19-2.31]). The overall RRs for treatment withdrawal due to TEAEs or any reason were 1.58 (1.04-2.40) and 1.27 (0.93-1.73), respectively. CONCLUSIONS: In adults with drug-refractory focal epilepsy, add-on BRV was effective to reduce seizure frequency and fairly well-tolerated. Further studies are needed to draw definitive conclusions about its efficacy in non-LEV-naive participants and evaluate its long-term safety profile.

Brivaracetam add-on for refractory focal epilepsy

LATTANZI, SIMONA;CAGNETTI, CLAUDIA;PROVINCIALI, LEANDRO;SILVESTRINI, Mauro
2016-01-01

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of the new antiepileptic drug brivaracetam (BRV) as add-on treatment for drug-resistant partial epilepsy using meta-analytical techniques. METHODS: Randomized, placebo-controlled, single- or double-blind, add-on trials of BRV in adult patients with drug-resistant partial epilepsy were identified through a systematic literature search. The following outcomes were assessed: 50% or greater reduction in seizure frequency, seizure freedom, incidence of treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs), and treatment withdrawal. Risk ratio (RR) with 95% confidence interval was estimated for each outcome. RESULTS: Six trials were included involving 2,399 participants according to the intent-to-treat, 1,715 for BRV, and 684 for placebo groups, respectively. The pooled RRs for the 50% responders and seizure freedom were 1.79 (1.51-2.12) and 4.74 (2.00-11.25), respectively. The subanalysis by levetiracetam (LEV) status did not show a statistically significant difference in the 50% responder rate when comparing BRV with placebo in patients with concomitant assumption of LEV. The TEAEs significantly associated with BRV were irritability (2.99 [1.28-6.97]), fatigue (2.19 [1.44-3.33]), somnolence (1.97 [1.45-2.68]), and dizziness (1.66 [1.19-2.31]). The overall RRs for treatment withdrawal due to TEAEs or any reason were 1.58 (1.04-2.40) and 1.27 (0.93-1.73), respectively. CONCLUSIONS: In adults with drug-refractory focal epilepsy, add-on BRV was effective to reduce seizure frequency and fairly well-tolerated. Further studies are needed to draw definitive conclusions about its efficacy in non-LEV-naive participants and evaluate its long-term safety profile.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11566/236298
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