The most common sleep disorder is sleep apnea, whose manifestations are long breathing pauses. Sleep apnea assessment is usually performed by polysomnography. During this long-term monitoring, patient respiration and other biosignals are recorded by many sensors, causing a high level of discomfort. Thus, methods able to indirectly estimate the biosignal of interest from the others measured should be preferred. Respiration indirectly measured from electrocardiogram (ECG) is called ECG-derived respiratory (EDR) signal. Recently, Segmented Beat Modulation Method (SBMM) was proposed as a good method for EDR signal estimation in normal breathing. Thus, the aim of this study was to assess the quality of EDR signal estimation by SBMM in pathological events of sleep apnea. With this purpose, sixteen long term polysomnographic recordings from MITBIH Polysomnographic Database were considered. After standard preprocessing, respiration and ECG signals were divided in 30s windows and, in order to match to provided annotations, each window was classified into Normal or Apnea. EDR signal was estimated by SBMM procedure from each ECG window. Respiration and EDR signals were then processed by Fourier analysis to extract respiration frequencies. Respiration frequencies computed from respiration and EDR signals were compared in term of error. Results confirmed the good quality of the estimated EDR signal. Respiration frequency extracted from EDR signal in both Normal (16[13;19]cpm) and Apnea windows (18[15;21]cpm) are equal to those extracted from respiration signal (Normal: 16 [13;19]cpm and Apnea: 18 [15;21]cpm), providing null error distributions. In conclusion, SBMM proved to be a promising tool for EDR signal estimation.

Electrocardiogram-Derived Respiratory Signal in Sleep Apnea by Segmented Beat Modulation Method

Sbrollini A.;Marcantoni I.;Nasim A.;Morettini M.;Burattini L.
2019-01-01

Abstract

The most common sleep disorder is sleep apnea, whose manifestations are long breathing pauses. Sleep apnea assessment is usually performed by polysomnography. During this long-term monitoring, patient respiration and other biosignals are recorded by many sensors, causing a high level of discomfort. Thus, methods able to indirectly estimate the biosignal of interest from the others measured should be preferred. Respiration indirectly measured from electrocardiogram (ECG) is called ECG-derived respiratory (EDR) signal. Recently, Segmented Beat Modulation Method (SBMM) was proposed as a good method for EDR signal estimation in normal breathing. Thus, the aim of this study was to assess the quality of EDR signal estimation by SBMM in pathological events of sleep apnea. With this purpose, sixteen long term polysomnographic recordings from MITBIH Polysomnographic Database were considered. After standard preprocessing, respiration and ECG signals were divided in 30s windows and, in order to match to provided annotations, each window was classified into Normal or Apnea. EDR signal was estimated by SBMM procedure from each ECG window. Respiration and EDR signals were then processed by Fourier analysis to extract respiration frequencies. Respiration frequencies computed from respiration and EDR signals were compared in term of error. Results confirmed the good quality of the estimated EDR signal. Respiration frequency extracted from EDR signal in both Normal (16[13;19]cpm) and Apnea windows (18[15;21]cpm) are equal to those extracted from respiration signal (Normal: 16 [13;19]cpm and Apnea: 18 [15;21]cpm), providing null error distributions. In conclusion, SBMM proved to be a promising tool for EDR signal estimation.
2019
978-1-7281-3570-0
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11566/272432
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