Cold recycled mixtures (CRM) offer a cost-effective and sustainable alternative to conventional hot technologies for the rehabilitation of asphalt pavements. Reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) is the main aggregate source for CRM, while binders normally include asphalt emulsion (or foamed asphalt) and portland cement. Because of the presence of water, emulsion and portland cement, CRM are evolutive materials and thus require a certain curing time to develop their long-term properties. The present study describes a laboratory approach for characterizing the properties of CRM, focusing on their evolutive behavior. The experimental activities were carried out in parallel at École de Technologie Supérieure in Montreal, Canada and at Università Politecnica delle Marche in Ancona, Italy. A common reference CRM composition was chosen in terms of grading curve, asphalt emulsion and portland cement contents. Locally available materials were selected to produce the CRM. Water loss by evaporation and indirect tensile strength (ITS) were measured for a 28-days period, in fixed curing conditions. The evolution of these properties was analyzed using the Michalis-Menten model, in order to achieve a quantitative characterization of the curing process. The results showed that different dosages of water resulted in different rates of water loss by evaporation, but did not penalize the development of ITS. Moreover, for both CRM, a good correlation was found between water loss and ITS. Finally, the data showed that after 28 days of curing in the selected laboratory conditions, the evaporation process was virtually completed.

A Laboratory Approach for Characterizing the Evolutive Behavior of Cold Recycled Mixtures

Andrea Graziani;Christian Iafelice;Simone Raschia;
2018

Abstract

Cold recycled mixtures (CRM) offer a cost-effective and sustainable alternative to conventional hot technologies for the rehabilitation of asphalt pavements. Reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) is the main aggregate source for CRM, while binders normally include asphalt emulsion (or foamed asphalt) and portland cement. Because of the presence of water, emulsion and portland cement, CRM are evolutive materials and thus require a certain curing time to develop their long-term properties. The present study describes a laboratory approach for characterizing the properties of CRM, focusing on their evolutive behavior. The experimental activities were carried out in parallel at École de Technologie Supérieure in Montreal, Canada and at Università Politecnica delle Marche in Ancona, Italy. A common reference CRM composition was chosen in terms of grading curve, asphalt emulsion and portland cement contents. Locally available materials were selected to produce the CRM. Water loss by evaporation and indirect tensile strength (ITS) were measured for a 28-days period, in fixed curing conditions. The evolution of these properties was analyzed using the Michalis-Menten model, in order to achieve a quantitative characterization of the curing process. The results showed that different dosages of water resulted in different rates of water loss by evaporation, but did not penalize the development of ITS. Moreover, for both CRM, a good correlation was found between water loss and ITS. Finally, the data showed that after 28 days of curing in the selected laboratory conditions, the evaporation process was virtually completed.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11566/259783
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